I’m having a bad day. I need chocolate. Truth be told, the day could be good or bad and I’d still need chocolate! It’s almost Easter too; surely that’s another excuse for a minor splurge on this food of the Gods? In this, my funky mood, I’ve reviewed a few options for buying Tasmanian choccies. Sharing will make me feel WAY better, and I hope it does the same for you.

Choccies - Mad About Apples
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Chocolate and caramel-coated: Mad About Apples

Think Choccies in Tasmania

Listed in no particular order, the following stories were published by Think Tasmania and feature choccies. Go get some!

Choccies - House of Anvers, Latrobe
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Choccies: House of Anvers, Latrobe (photo by Dan Fellow)

Cadbury Chocolate Factory, Hobart

The Cadbury Visitor Centre is located at the company’s chocolate-making factory in Claremont. It’s only accessible via guided information sessions from Monday to Friday, excluding public holidays and some closure periods, so that counts out a visit during the Easter weekend. However, customers have been known to score great bargains from the factory outlet immediately after Easter… giant eggs for $5-00, for example.

Choccies - Cadbury Factory
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Giant chocolate Easter egg: Cadbury Factory, Hobart

Battery Point and Salamanca Market, Hobart

There’s a great little milk bar in Hampden Road, Battery Point that offers more choccies and lollies than milk. Yes! They have an amazing display of candy jars in the window, and when you enter the shop: more jars filled with more sweet treats! The choices are mind-boggling.

Choccies - Battery Point Milk Bar
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Battery Point Milk Bar… loaded with choccies!

If you’re in town on a Saturday for Salamanca Market, you can buy rocky road from a gorgeous lady dressed all in pink. Her stall is very pretty and loaded with goodies.

Choccies - Salamanca Market
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Rocky Road from Salamanca Market

House of Anvers, Latrobe

The House of Anvers is an award-winning chocolate factory and cafe between Devonport and the town of Latrobe in the north west coast region of Tasmania. Visit for tastings, peruse the chocolate museum and enjoy family-friendly dining. Watch the choccies being processed, then make your selection from the retail store. It’s all there… very conveniently!

Choccies - House of Anvers
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Choccies: The House of Anvers (photo by Dan Fellow)

Nutpatch Nougat, Kettering

Nutpatch Nougat could well be one of Tasmania’s best-kept secrets. Hidden away in a nondescript building that once housed a service station, you need to stay alert when driving through Kettering in the D’Entrecasteaux Channel region south of Hobart to even find the tiny shop. But once you do find it, and you walk into the air-conditioned room filled with a gorgeous array of chocolate treats, well…. you’ll never forget your first time.

We’ve been lucky enough to visit the shop twice actually. Once with Judy from Eye See Personalised Tours and again with Sally from Herbaceous Tours. I’ve probably said this before, but I’ll say it again… those ladies know all the great places to visit.

Choccies - Nutpatch Nougat
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Chocolates from Kettering: Nutpatch Nougat

Fudge in Tasmania

If your preferred chocolate indulgence tends to involve fudge, you should refer to our Fudge in Tasmania article detailing lots and lots of fudge options. I’m sure the Easter Bunny would be happy to deliver some of those tasty morsels this year, along with the regular choccies.

Choccies - Fudgey Fudge
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Gourmet Fudgey: handmade in Tasmania

The Art of Tea, Kingston

If you’d like something a little less severe on the waistline, The Art of Tea has just the ticket for you. Nudi Tea, a truly indulgent blend, was made for MONA. It’s a black flavoured tea with dark chocolate nuggets, cocoa beans and dark chocolate shavings. The chocolate is sourced from the House of Anvers in Latrobe.

Choccies - The Art of Tea
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The Art of Tea chocolate, MONA (photo by Jen Holdsworth)

Modo Mio Naked Brownies, Devonport

Yet another form of chocolate, Modo Mio Naked Brownies is the flavour of the month right now, winning lots of awards and gaining widespread recognition. The brownies are free of additives, preservatives and anything nasty… only the good stuff here!

These luxury choccies are made with local ingredients including Anvers couverture chocolate, Kindred Organics spelt flour, Ashgrove and Duck River butters, and free-range eggs from Railton. It’s a full-on chocolate sensation from passionate foodie Susanne Dobrowski, who’s based in Devonport.

Choccies - Modo Mio Naked Brownies
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Modo Mio Naked Brownies

Sirocco South, Carlton

Spending time at the Sirocco South stall at the Farm Gate Market proved one thing for certain. His customers agree that Mic Giuliani does make Tasmania’s best cannoli, just as he claims. Having tried both flavours, the verdict is still out on a favourite. A crisp, sweet pastry shell filled with either a duo of vanilla and chocolate custard, or a Sicilian cream (ricotta, candied fruit, pistachio nuts and dark chocolate). Both are heavenly!

Choccies - Sirocco South Cannoli
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Chocolate Cannoli: Sirocco South, Tasmania

More Choccies Where They Came From

To be honest, we’ve just listed a portion of the stories we could have. Obviously, in hindsight, we’ve featured chocolate a LOT on the website. Why would that be, I wonder? This process has certainly made me feel much better, so thank-you to all Think Tasmania’s readers for the inspiration. We wish everyone a safe and happy Easter holiday.

Choccies - The Old Woolstore
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Chocolate pot: Stockmans Restaurant, The Old Woolstore

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