“It was GREAT!!!!! We had a wonderful three days at Corinna. Here are some of my images showcasing the Pieman River for Think Tasmania.” That’s it… that’s all the information you’ll get from Dan Fellow. He’s a man of very few written words; he lets his pictures do the talking. And who are we to argue with that?

Pieman River - Tasmania
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Pieman River: Way Out West in Tasmania

We can at least tell you where you’ll find the Pieman River, should you wish to explore the region yourselves. Head west… far west and a little bit northish, to be very imprecise. The river flows into the Southern Ocean on the north west coast of Tasmania, part of the remote Tarkine wilderness.

Since we’ve recently featured the Gordon Dam on the website, it’s relevant to note the Pieman River was also dammed. The building of Reece Dam in 1986 created Lake Pieman. With Pieman Road and Pieman River State Reserve also marked on the map (see below, at the end of this article) it begs the question… who was the Pie Man?

Pieman River - Tasmania
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Pieman River - Tasmania
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Pieman River - Tasmania
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Pieman River - Tasmania
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Pieman River - Tasmania
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Who Was The Pie Man Then?

You really shouldn’t believe everything you read on the Internet, but I did come across a couple of interesting theories about the naming of the river. It’s been noted that convict Alexander Pearce liked to eat other humans. The cannibal was dubbed “The Pieman” in typically Australian fashion, and it’s been suggested the river was given his moniker. If the rather gruesome story about cannibalism is true, I have no idea why you’d name a major feature of the Tasmanian landscape in his honour!

The more likely and seemingly widely accepted version, revolves around convict escapee Thomas Kent. The pastry-cook (or pie man) absconded from the Macquarie Harbour convict site and was recaptured near the mouth of the river. Hence, the Pieman.

Pieman River - Tasmania
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Pieman River - Tasmania
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Pieman River - Tasmania
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Pieman River - Tasmania
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Pieman River - Tasmania
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Convict, Power, Mining, Timber and Industrial Heritage

No doubt Carol Haberle, our doyen of Tasmanian history, will be able to fill in all the gaps for us when she’s fully recovered. Some of her earlier articles speak of the naming of Tasmanian towns as well as Hydro schemes encompassed by the Pieman River Power Development (such as Lake Mackintosh) and mining heritage ranging from Waratah to Zeehan. Carol’s articles about Tullah and the Wee Georgie Wood Railway also connect with this criss-cross of information about the west coast of Tasmania, the region being one of her passions.

However, I digress. Today we’re lucky to enjoy these images from Dan Fellow. They alone are enough to inspire a visit to the Tasmanian wilderness of the north west: Corinna and the Pieman River. Please enjoy.

Pieman River - Tasmania
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Pieman River - Tasmania
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Pieman River - Tasmania
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Pieman River - Tasmania
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Pieman River - Tasmania
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To see more work by Dan Fellow follow Tasmania Photos on Facebook. You can also purchase Desktop Tasmania, a multimedia CD with a stunning collection of Tasmanian photos. You can contact Dan Fellow by email or phone 0417 776 566.

Dan Fellow is a registered member of Think Tasmania.

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Map: Pieman River, Tasmania