Right now, Tasmanian Historians are required to assist the production company Joined Up Films. With a new 8-part series due to screen on the ABC in 2011, researchers desperately need information for an episode about a house in Battery Point and it’s heritage. Tasmania has a great opportunity to feature in the show called Who’s Been Sleeping in My House? And you could be part of the action!

Tasmanian Historians - Heritage Battery Point
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Tasmanian historians: heritage Battery Point

Tasmanian Historians: Battery Point

The house in Battery Point, Hobart is called Oljato which means Water by Moonlight. How lovely! The episode will include local heritage and past residents. Joined Up Films are hoping Tasmanian historians can help them answer questions the current owners have about their house. Any information or photos that would help uncover some of the history would be useful.

Tasmanian Historians - Oljato, Battery Point
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Oljato, Battery Point: Heritage Tasmanian house in Hobart

With filming scheduled to start in Tasmania mid to late January, there’s no time to waste. Maybe you know someone who is an expert on history in Tasmania that could assist? Please contact Think Tasmania and we’ll forward your details to the production crew.

Heritage Tasmania: Pontville

Who’s Been Sleeping in My House? will also feature a second historical Tasmanian property in Pontville (southern Midlands, north of Hobart) called The Sheiling. So two out of eight episodes will feature  Tasmanian history – not a bad ratio! We’ve been trying to tell you there’s lots of interesting snippets to uncover around the island state.

Tasmanian Historians - The Sheiling, Pontville
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Heritage house, Tasmania: The Sheiling, Pontville

Even if you’re not a Tasmanian historian, you might still be interested in watching the series. Here’s the promotion released to the media last year about the show.

WHO’S BEEN SLEEPING IN MY HOUSE?

A new 8 x 30 minute factual series, Who’s Been Sleeping In My House? will go into production in August for ABC TV. Each week this program will visit an Australian house and its owners in a quest to uncover the stories and history of their home.

The series is presented by a fresh new face – Melbourne-based archaeologist and cultural heritage expert Adam Ford, who takes the viewers on an investigative journey. We follow Adam as he zigzags his way through archives, family albums, interviews, data bases, and home movies. Meeting social historians and relatives of past owners along the way, he pieces together a past that isn’t recorded in the history books.

Tasmanian Historians - Presenter, Adam Ford
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Adam Ford

As well as being a natural storyteller, presenter Adam Ford brings specialist expertise. Adam has 20 years’ experience as a professional archaeologist, having investigated a remarkable range of sites in Australia and around the world, including the site of Ned Kelly’s last stand, prehistoric desert camps, Cold War rocket bases, medieval castles and desert island shipwrecks.

ABC TV’s Head of Factual, Jennifer Collins said, “Each week we visit a house that you might drive past every day and never give a second look. And yet within its rooms are the hidden stories of our past; the lives of the people who lived, loved, bore children, died or just moved on. This is our history, told by the people who have slept in our homes. It is an exciting original format for ABC TV audiences and promises to reveal both personal histories and stories of Australian significance.”

This 8-part series will be supported by a website which gives viewers the tips and tricks to trace the history of their own homes.

From a production base in Perth, Who’s Been Sleeping In My House? will feature the stories of eight houses across the country.

Tasmanian Historians - Heritage Tasmania, Pontville
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Attention all Tasmanian historians and heritage buffs!

Tasmanian Historians with relevant information should contact Think Tasmania

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