On our way to Turners Beach, we detoured to Braddons Lookout. The decision was made on the strength of Carol Haberle’s photography skills. We knew it to be a stunning location thanks to an image supplied for a sunset compilation published by Think Tasmania. And we were not disappointed in the location at all.

Braddons Lookout - Sunset, Forth Tasmania
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Braddons Lookout, Forth Tasmania (photo by Carol Haberle)

Forth Valley Views

The homes on Braddons Lookout Road must boast some of the most outstanding rural views in all of Tasmania. The Braddons Lookout viewing platform itself has a wonderful vista, with detailed information about the surrounding area. The project was undertaken by the Lions Club of Forth Valley and opened 7 February 2004.

Braddons Lookout - Lions Club of Forth Valley
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Project by Lions Club of Forth Valley

The following quote comes from The Sydney Morning Herald online article about Forth Tasmania

Braddons Lookout Road leads to Braddons Lookout, which was named after Sir Edward Nicholas Coventry Braddon who, after a long career in the British civil service, arrived in Tasmania in 1878, entered state parliament in 1879 and was premier from 1894-99. The lookout affords excellent views across the Forth valley towards Turners Beach and Leith.

Braddons Lookout - Forth Valley
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Fabulous rural Tasmania views: Forth Valley

Finding Braddons Lookout

Braddons Lookout is well-signposted and accessed from the Bass Highway, via Braddons Lookout Road, Forth Road or Leith Road. The main intersection is close to Turners Beach, between Devonport and Ulverstone in the Cradle Coast region of north west Tasmania.

Braddons Lookout - Think Tasmania
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Braddons Lookout: tourist attraction in Tasmania

We were certainly impressed with our visit to Braddons Lookout. We’ll add more information about our trip to Turners Beach in the near future.

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