I have often imagined Michelangelo’s David coming to life and walking about the Galleria dell’Accademia at midnight, and seeing the remarkable work of Greg Duncan at The Wall at Derwent Bridge leaves me with the same impression.

Greg Duncan - Wall in the Wilderness
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The Wall in the Wilderness, Derwent Bridge Tasmania

The Wall in the Wilderness

by Len Langan

Surely these images of the men and horses who triumphed over nature to build the Tasmania we love are more than timber, more than art and nothing short of reality frozen by some magic for the viewing day. Their souls and spirits must stir when we are not looking. Their voices must be heard in the stillness of the night.

This monumental work is a tour de force in the art world and it ought to be a criminal offence for anyone not to see it. It leaves one positively awestruck with all the wonders of creation and mankind’s role in all that is laudable on our planet. These carvings transcend the ordinary by a mile and a half reminding us of our debt to the horse. That noble animal that once provided the muscle to transform our striving ambitions into reality. The beast we took to war to sacrifice to our folly and the beast that ploughed the fields for us, and transported us as a burden to our sometimes glorious present age.

Greg Duncan - Wall in the Wilderness
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The Wall in the Wilderness, Derwent Bridge Tasmania

One can almost hear the brains of these carved human beings ticking as they plan their still far from forgotten dreams and are we sure that the horses did not move restlessly as we blinked an eye? Did one of the wooden chains clink and a twig crack beneath a hoof? Surely that Tasmanian Tiger smiled at us inwardly laughing at us because we think that he is extinct and he knows better; after dark.

Greg Duncan - Wall in the Wilderness
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The Wall in the Wilderness, Derwent Bridge Tasmania

A Masterpiece by Greg Duncan

Greg Duncan has created a self-funded monumental masterpiece for us and a place in our hearts and our history books. One hundred meters of carving each taking a month to work on panels three meters high by one meter wide.

Greg Duncan - Wall in the Wilderness
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The Wall in the Wilderness, Derwent Bridge Tasmania

At the time of writing, The Wall in the Wilderness opens 9:00 to 5:00 September to April and 9:00 to 4:00 May to August, closing only on Christmas Day, Good Friday and 6-19 August every year. The Wall is located at 15352 Lyell Highway, 2km east of Derwent Bridge, a small town in the Tasmanian Highlands, midway between Hobart and Strahan, and close to Lake St Clair. Look for the signs at the entrance.

Greg Duncan - Wall in the Wilderness
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The Wall in the Wilderness, Derwent Bridge Tasmania

Len Langan lives in Longford with his wife Jill.  They are both passionate about Tasmanian heritage and tourism and things that can be done in this industry. Len writes about Tasmanian history  for both The Courier in Longford and the magazine Sagacity,  and works with Virtuosi taking music to rural areas.

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Map: Derwent Bridge, Tasmania

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